Tag Archives: sanjeev

Sanjeev Nanda on How to Speed up on a New Job

2 Jul

Asking for Help When You’re New to the Job

Sanjeev Nanda how to guides

Start a new job with a positive attitude

When you transfer to a new division or start a job with a new employer, it’s natural to want to demonstrate mastery of your position from day one.

Many bosses make the irrational assumption that by merely breathing the air of the cubicle farm, you’ll absorb all the information you need.

Against that daunting background, how can you meet the challenge of getting the help that’s required to get up to speed on a new job?  Approach the task the way a journalist would get the story — by asking the five W’s.


If your company has effective training and orientation programs, why do you have to ask for further help?  The only way to become a savvy journalist or to succeed at your hedge-fund firm is to ask a lot of questions.

You also must demonstrate the rationale for your inquiries to the people whose time you take up. Your attitude and presentation are key; you must project confidence that your requests for information and guidance are reasonable and necessary.

Do ask about training, documentation and other resources you can use to educate yourself without taking up people’s time.


You can demonstrate your respect for other people’s time by being careful about what you ask. When you ask, you want to be very specific and share what you already know.

But don’t confine your queries to the procedural; seek out what makes your new workplace tick. Ask a peer, “What are some things that you wish you’d known before you started working here?’ Try to get at the subtle culture issues. “Is this an email culture or an IM culture?”

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Ask questions like you were born to ask them


You will quickly build a reputation as a thoughtful worker if you carefully consider who in your organization is best-suited to answer your questions and otherwise render aid. Create your own map of who does what in your organization, a sort of annotated version of the standard organisation chart.

You’ll also need help in your initial efforts to jump-start your information-collection system. A key tactic is to pose this meta-question to your boss or other ranking manager: “Who else could I go to with this sort of question (so that I don’t have to take up your time)?”

Where (and How)?

Just as important as asking the right questions of the right person is choosing the optimal communications medium for your inquiries.

Ask your coworkers and boss what typically goes out on email; you just want to know what the norms are. That email is never the most effective medium when a dialog is required.

When you ask a question of a superior, let them know that you’ll be happy to take their response in whatever form is easiest for them. If they choose to answer your detailed email with a brain dump to your voicemail, just be grateful for the information.


One way to alienate coworkers and superiors from the get-go is to ask too many questions too soon, before you need the answers and can absorb them.

Of course, you’ll still have plenty of legitimate questions in the early going, and that’s a good thing. Ask early and often. “If you ask often, people will see you as curious.”

As you move past the first stage of your tenure in a new position, consider giving back to your company’s next generation of newbies by volunteering to put together documentation of key information for new hires, whether it’s a company glossary, a guidebook or an intranet page that indexes internal resources.

Finally, if you ever get discouraged by any friction you create by asking for help, look at the big picture. You have to remember that you’re asking questions not just for yourself, but to advance the goals of the organization, So you can be as forceful as you need to be.


Sanjeev Nanda on How to Write a Good Report

1 Jul

This post describes how to write a good report. This is based on common mistakes I have observed over a period of time. While most of the following apply in general, they have been written with management and engineering students in mind.

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Report writing is nothing short of an Art

Structure of a report

The following should roughly be the structure of a report. Note that these are just guidelines, not rules. You have to use your intelligence in working out the details of your specific writing.

  • Title and abstract: These are the most-read parts of a report. This is how you attract attention to your writing. The title should reflect what you have done and should bring out any eye-catching factor of your work, for good impact.The abstract should be short, generally within about 2 paragraphs (250 words or so total). The abstract should contain the essence of the report, based on which the reader decides whether to go ahead with reading the report or not. It can contain the following in varying amounts of detail as is appropriate: main motivation, main design point, essential difference from previous work, methodology, and some eye-catching results if any.
  • Introduction: Most reports start with an introduction section. This section should answer the following questions (not necessarily in that order, but what is given below is a logical order). After title/abstract introduction and conclusions are the two mainly read parts of a report.
    • What is the setting of the problem? This is, in other words, the background. In some cases, this may be implicit, and in some cases, merged with the motivation below.
    • What exactly is the problem you are trying to solve? This is the problem statement.
    • Why is the problem important to solve? This is the motivation. In some cases, it may be implicit in the background, or the problem statement itself.
    • Is the problem still unsolved? The constitutes the statement of past/related work crisply.
    • Why is the problem difficult to solve? This is the statement of challenges.
    • How have you solved the problem? Here you state the essence of your approach. This is of course expanded upon later, but it must be stated explicitly here.
    • What are the conditions under which your solution is applicable? This is a statement of assumptions.
    • What are the main results? You have to present the main summary of the results here.
    • What is the summary of your contributions? This in some cases may be implicit in the rest of the introduction. Sometimes it helps to state contributions explicitly.
    • How is the rest of the report organized? Here you include a paragraph on the flow of ideas in the rest of the report. For any report beyond 4-5 pages, this is a must.

    The introduction is nothing but a shorter version of the rest of the report, and in many cases the rest of the report can also have the same flow. Think of the rest of the report as an expansion of some of the points in the introduction. Which of the above bullets are expanded into separate sections (perhaps even multiple sections) depends very much on the problem.

  • Background: This is expanded upon into a separate section if there is sufficient background which the general reader must understand before knowing the details of your work. It is usual to state that “the reader who knows this background can skip this section” while writing this section.
  • Past/related work: It is common to have this as a separate section, explaining why what you have done is something novel. Here, you must try to think of dimensions of comparison of your work with other work. For instance, you may compare in terms of functionality, in terms of performance, and/or in terms of approach. EAlthough not mandatory, it is good presentation style to give the above comparison in terms of a table; where the rows are the various dimensions of comparison and the columns are various pieces of related work, with your own work being the first/last column.While in general you try to play up your work with respect to others, it is also good to identify points where your solution is not so good compared to others. If you state these explicitly, the reader will feel better about them, than if you do not state and the reader figures out the flaws in your work anyway :-).Another point is with respect to the placement of related work. One possibility is to place it in the beginning of the report (after intro/background). Another is to place it in the end of the report (just before conclusions). This is a matter of judgment, and depends on the following aspect of your work. If there are lots of past work related very closely to your work, then it makes sense to state upfront as to what the difference in your approach is. On the other hand, if your work is substantially different from past work, then it is better to put the related work at the end. While this conveys a stronger message, it has the risk of the reader wondering all through the report as to how your work is different from some other specific related work.
  • Future work: This section in some cases is combined along with the “conclusions” section. Here you state aspects of the problem you have not considered and possibilities for further extensions.
  • Conclusions: Readers usually read the title, abstract, introduction, and conclusions. In that sense, this section is quite important. You have to crisply state the main take-away points from your work. How has the reader become smarter, or how has the world become a better place because of your work?


Sanjeev Nanda how to guides

Start Writing early don't wait for the last moment

No report is perfect, and definitely not on the first version. Well written reports are those which have gone through multiple rounds of refinement. This refinement may be through self-reading and critical analysis, or more effectively through peer-feedback (or feedback from advisor/instructor).

Here are some things to remember:

  • Start early, don’t wait for the completion of your work in its entirety before starting to write.
  • Each round of feedback takes about a week at least. And hence it is good to have a rough version at least a month in advance. For a good quality report, it is good to have a rough version at least 2 months in advance.
  • Feedback should go through the following stages ideally: (a) you read it yourself fully once and revise it, (b) have your peers review it and give constructive feedback, and then (c) have your advisor/instructor read it.

Recommended strategy for producing a high-quality report

Based on the above, I recommend the following strategy for students who want to produce a high-quality report, which would then have a high potential for being turned into a publication:

  • Think through the outline of the report even as you are working on the details of the problem. Such thinking will also lend focus to your work and you will end up optimizing the returns on the time invested.
  • Two months before the actual deadline, you have to have at least a paragraph-level outline of the report, with all details worked out.
  • After one round of critical analysis by yourselves (or by your group), have another student or another group review it, perhaps in exchange for you reviewing their work. Have them check your flow of ideas. While it may be good to get someone working in the same area, for much of the feedback, this may not really be necessary.
  • Now you are probably about 6-7 weeks from the deadline. At this point, have your advisor/instructor give feedback on the paragraph-level outline. Getting this early is important since, based on this, you may have to reorganize your report, rework your theorems, or rerun your experiments/simulations.
  • Have a pre-final version of the report ready 2 weeks before the deadline. Again, go through one round of self/peer-feedback, and then advisor/instructor feedback.
  • With these 3-4 rounds of revision and critical analysis, the quality of your report is bound to improve. And since many of the student theses are of good quality, quality of writing dramatically improves chances of publication.

Sanjeev Nanda tips on Long Distance Riding

30 Jun

To most motorbike riders, 700 kilometers in a day seems like too much. For some riders, even 200 sound like too much. It shouldn’t. If you are in reasonable shape, covering 500 to 600 kilometers in a day of riding on the open road or 300 odd kilometers in the hills should not be too strenuous. Riding long distance entails a re-calibration of your fatigue threshold. Like the ‘second wind’ experienced by a marathon runner, long hours in the saddle reveal similar reserves that exist within us. Usually, after 5 hours on the road, nearly every rider feels tired. Yet, pushing oneself even an hour beyond this apparent tiredness shows quite clearly that it will not get any worse. The body may feel a need to rest but the mind can push it on for twice that time without damage. The trick is in keeping your eyes on the target and paying attention to details.

"Sanjeev Nanda" how to guides

Motorbiking is pure passion, enjoy every moment you spend on your bike

1. Keep your bike in top mechanical condition

A failure 2 days into the tour and in the middle of nowhere is a thoroughly avoidable event. The engine tuning, control cables, brake pads and fluid, tyres, electricals, drive chain and even the frame need periodic checks.

2. Carry all the relevant documents in original, with a photocopy placed elsewhere. The R/C Book, Pollution certificate and Insurance policy (even the cover note will suffice).

3. Being in a reasonably fit physical shape helps the rider stay alert even at the end of a 10-hour ride. Fitness stretches one’s fatigue threshold.

4. Plan your route, along with any alternatives, and calculate equipment and financial requirements according to the longest probable route. Good road maps are a must. Especially the ones that show distances (with heights in case of hills) accurately and mark petrol pumps that actually exist. Being stranded without fuel is depressing at the best and life threatening at worst if you get caught at high altitude late in the day and without equipment to spend the night in the open.

5. On highways within India, doing about 200 kms stretches between breaks is usually the limit.

6. Carry only as much luggage as is totally essential, but never skimp on tools and repair equipment. Carry all that you would need, short of towing another similar bike behind you. Tie the luggage securely on the bike. If riding one-up, tie it on the seat behind as it gives your back some added support and stops the wind from getting in from behind you.

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Travel Light for added pleasure

7. Tie the bag so tight that it cannot be moved sideways or up and down at all. A loosely tied bag will keep sliding this way or that and apart from distracting you, could act as a pendulous mass in case of a rear wheel slide during panic stops. Being well behind the centre of gravity of the bike, even a 15kg bag could exert enough leverage to make the otherwise controllable slide totally wild.

8. Prefer a bag with side pockets that are not covered by the tie-down straps. Keep the frequently needed stuff like the water bottle, small tool kit, the first aid kit, spare goggles etc in them. Pack the bag such that the heavier things are at the bottom and the lighter ones on top. Keep extra clothes and rain gear outside the bag. Secure it on top with bungee cords or elastic net. Don’t forget to wrap these things in a polythene bag first or the dust and grime enroute would not leave them worth wearing.

9. Keep a separate helmet at home for exclusive use during the long tours. Make sure its visor is clean, scratch-free and seals out the dust effectively. Following a truck or bus on a narrow and dusty mountain road at slow speed will prove you its real worth.

10. Wear a cotton or silk balaclava before putting on the helmet, whatever the weather. It protects the inside of your helmet from oily perspiration and stops insects from getting into your ears and nose if you need to ride with the visor open. Two thin cotton balaclavas inside a well fitting helmet can see you through the coldest ride.

11. Wear a cotton inner in summer (a cotton track suit is ideal), and preferably a wool one in winter. Au outer windproof jacket with a closed collar is useful, whatever the season. Even 20degC summer mornings can be uncomfortably cold when doing a 100-kmph for hours together. (Remember the wind-chill factor). Also, when riding in those hot summers, contrary to instinct, cover yourself well, leaving as little skin exposed as possible. The dry hot wind blows away perspiration before it can cool you and since every bit of liquid near the skin gets dried up almost immediately, you get dehydrated pretty soon. Clothes help retain this water. And keep drinking water or cold drinks frequently.

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Biker Jacket for all weather

12. For cold weather riding, dress in layers comprising of wool, cotton and wind-proofs. A layer of cotton inners followed by a wool tracksuit, then a thin windproof jacket, which in turn is covered, by a heavier quilted windproof jacket can take you through sub-zero riding conditions. Gloves are a must but of the kind that don’t compromise on feel and grip, whether wet or dry. To avoid wind-chilled hands in winters, wear latex rubber surgical gloves over woolen ones. Leather though, is ideal. Improvise a nape cover for the gloves using a non-slip type polythene bag.

13. Dress your lower extremities the same way as the top. Two layers, one cotton and the other wool followed by good windproof pants that close around the ankles are sufficient. Boots should have thick non-slip rubber soles, a metal reinforced toe cap and should reach above the ankles.

14. A set of dark glasses for bright sunlight and clear one’s for night riding, are important. Needless to say, they should be scratch-free and a good fit.

15. The rain suit should be made of rubberised cloth and its seams must be double sealed, pasted together and not stitched. The stitch-holes will leak, no matter what the manufacturer claims.

16. However far or near the destination, try to leave early in the morning, pre dawn preferably. The sight of a new day breaking, while you ride, is somehow very rejuvenating. And the added benefit is of very little traffic so early in the day.

17. Take frequent breaks, at least every 2 hours, when on a long ride. After 10 hrs on the saddle, you might need to stop even more frequently, to fight fatigue. When riding in the cold, take frequent breaks for warm food and drinks. Do not keep riding until you get numb. You could be closer to hypothermia than you realise and could crash from delayed reactions.

18. Drink lots of water on the way. The wind rushing past carries away more water from the rider’s body than he would loose if walking or travelling in a covered vehicle. In cold weather, tea and coffee are good substitutes but for the frequent toilet breaks, since both of these are diuretics.

19. Keep a fuel log. It helps you monitor the mileage your bike is giving apart from keeping the fuel expenses in the picture. In areas where fuel stations are far and apart, you can easily assess whether you can make the distance or not.

20. Maintain a steady fast pace for long stretches. Rushing along for sometime and then stopping every hour will actually reduce the ultimate distance you cover in a given time span. Remember the Hare and the Tortoise!

21. Wrap sandwiches or paranthas in aluminum foil and clamp it somewhere on the engine casing. You get hot food whenever you stop for a tea break! A real treat in those chilling winter rides.

22. Ride the long road with the attitude of someone on a holiday. Leave that poisonous urban rush behind. Set a target for the day but don’t keep chasing it all day. Relax! You are out for fun.

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Enjoy the ride, be cautious and responsible

23. When in the hills, keep to your side and watch out for gravel, oil, water or pine needles on the inside of blind curves. In winter, during frosting conditions, watch out for the treacherous ‘black ice’. Water or even moisture on the road gets frozen into clear ice and it is very-very slippery. This happens even on a bright sunny afternoon on the shady side of the mountain.

24. With snow or a crust of crunchy ice on the road, a bike ridden two up is more stable than with a single rider. Due to the added weight, the wheels an cut through the ice to grip the road.

25. If there’s a stream flowing across the road, watch for slippery moss covered rocks underneath. Keep the bike upright and avoid sudden direction changes.

26. Night riding in the hills is, in a sense, safer than during daytime. You can see the approaching vehicle’s lights beyond a curve. Also, you are more focussed since all you can see is what gets lit up by the headlight. There are no distracting views to see around. Prefer a headlamp that gives a wide beam spread as it enables you to see which way the road goes beyond a curve. A narrow focus beam lets you see straight ahead but not where the road is heading beyond the turn.

27. Night riding in the plains is a different ball-game. Follow a fast 4 wheeler at a safe distance and use its lights to see ahead. A bike is not the king of the road at night.

28. Practice doing minor repairs, in darkness, or with your eyes closed. Things like changing the control cables, the headlight bulb or the spark plug. You could get stuck with any of these failures in total darkness.

29. Always carry a spare tube even if you have puncture patches. And, before hitting the road, check the expiry of those puncture patches and adhesive. In case of sudden deflation of a tyre while riding at speed, never brake the punctured wheel. The tyre will jump the rim and you get thrown off the bike.

30. A couple of meters length of insulated wire and insulation tape are indispensable for on the spot electrical repairs.

31. Carry a 12ft X 16ft plastic sheet. It works as an emergency rain shelter. Put it across the seats of two bikes parked parallel with a 5ft gap in between for you to sit. You get an instant roof and the luggage gets added protection from rain. Keep a stout rope, about 15ft long, for emergency towing.

32. As a ritual, check engine oil, brakes, control cables, chain tension and lights each day before starting. Keeps you in touch with the bike and you are not easily caught by a surprising failure.

33. Intersections are popular places for spills. Keep that head on the swivel and preferably let another vehicle run interference between you and the cross traffic. Let him take the hit if some moron jumps the light. Any larger vehicle is far better equipped to take on impacts than an exposed motorcyclist.

34. Passing a bus that has pulled over at a stop, look at the road ahead of its front tyre from under its bumper for brave pedestrians who believe in crossing in front of a parked bus!

35. With disc brakes common, the increased braking power could get translated into a rear end collision if you brake hard and surprise a tailgating motorist. So watch those mirrors before dropping anchor.

36. Alcohol is a great deluder. It makes you feel strong when you are weak, capable when your abilities are diminished. Maybe that’s the attraction behind it. Don’t, please don’t mix alcohol with 2-wheeler riding. Since the ‘robot skills’ of starting, stopping and steering are not much affected, the drinker is deluded into believing that all his reflexes and riding faculties are intact. Not so. Even ½ a bottle of beer (that’s just 5% blood alcohol level, half of the legal limit) just takes away the rider’s ability to cope with the unexpected. And mishaps are unexpected.

37. Stitch a piece of chamois leather to the back of your left glove’s fore finger. A quick wipe across the visor in rain improves vision substantially.

38. At night, deflect the angle of your rear view mirrors a little to avoid the glare from vehicles following you. Adjust the angle so that you have to lean forwards a little to look into them

39. When riding in a strong crosswind, crouch to make yourself as small a target for the wind as possible. Tuck in your arms, narrow your shoulders, bend your back, slide back on the seat to get your head close to the tank and grab the tank with your knees. In short, shrink. And turn into putty. Relax your body and retain a firm yet resilient relationship with the bike. Let your body move a bit with every gust and absorb its energy on its own without shaking up the bike. And watch for sudden changes in the wind force due to static (trees, houses) and moving (cars, trucks, buses) windbreaks. They stop the wind as you pass them and it comes back in force suddenly when you are past them.

40. Fatigue is one major factor that can result in lax reflexes and diminished ability of the eyes to focus. Rest, if possible. If not, then concentrate on focussing on distant objects to avoid falling into the trap of focussing on ‘nothing’ in front of you, the ‘seeing yet not seeing’ syndrome. And keep those eyes moving. Take a short break or a nap when sleepy. Driving drunk or drowsy is the same.

41. Develop peripheral vision, that ability to be aware of what’s going on in the far edges of your sight while looking straight ahead. While riding, fix your eyes on the road and traffic ahead and without moving your head, try to monitor the traffic on either side of you. We usually sacrifice side vision when we concentrate on what’s ahead.

42. Braking performance is degraded when carrying a passenger, mainly because the added weight lengthens the stopping distance. Same with cornering. The extra weight takes up suspension travel and makes the bike less responsive to steering inputs. So take it easy when tow-up and extend those safety margins.

43. The passenger should hold on to the riders waist or lower chest. Grab rails leave the passengers wobbly, making the bike unsteady. Tell the passenger to look over your inside shoulder, stay in line with the bike, hold on to you and relax.

44. To cover long distances in a day, the first rule is to keep moving. Don’t dawdle over lunch and tea breaks. Minimize your stops by combining tasks. Take a leak, drink water, change your jacket and tighten the luggage in one go. The second rule is to keep the stops short. Maintain a steady fast pace balancing the time gained against the risk factors. At the end of 100 kms, doing 95 instead of 85 makes you gain some 15 odd minutes. Which is about an hour less on a 400km ride. See if it is worth pushing yourself and your bike so close to the limits to gain just an hour in 8 hours of riding.

45. When riding through deep water that submerges the exhaust pipe, keep the bike in first gear and those RPM’s up. If the engine stops, water will enter the tailpipe and maybe enter the engine. Do not attempt to re-start the engine as the water inside can severely damage it.

46. When riding through sand, drop tyre pressures by upto 40% (The idea here is to improve tyre floatation i.e. its ability to ride on top of the sand through increasing the contact patch), keep the bike in low gears and steer straight. In sand, always remember that the wheels have a tendency to dig in, so when coming to a halt, do so gently or the sand piles up ahead of the front wheel making the subsequent pick-up difficult.

47. Keep a 2-mtr long piece of fuel pipe for emergency fuel transfers from one vehicle to another. Also, have a flat board of wood, about 12″X8″ handy, to put under the main stand if you need to park your bike on soft ground. Otherwise, use only the side-stand, with a small flat rock placed under it, for parking on soft ground.

Note: What appears to be hard ground now could become soft after even a short rain shower. Even hard tarmac becomes unusually soft on a very hot afternoon.

Travel the high road on a motorcycle for the fun of travelling. The highways are not proving grounds for speed and tricks. They are means of getting to far off places. Respect and be considerate for other road users, especially the villagers who were there before the highways came into being. Leave ‘Mr. Hurry’ and ‘Miss Speeding’ behind when you tie those bags. Wear your helmet, eye protection and proper safety gear. Just savour the freedom your mechanical steed provides you with and ride so that you can ride again and again.

Sanjeev Nanda tips for Shooting in the Dark

28 Jun
Sanjeev Nanda tips and tricks

Night time aura is mesmerizing

There’s something mysterious and seductive about nighttime photography. Perhaps it’s the romantic air of celebratory fireworks or a gentle snowfall.

Maybe it’s the eeriness of an old, dilapidated farmhouse or an ancient cemetery on a foggy eve. A spooky scarecrow or an old wooden fence may also make great targets for your camera’s roving eye.

Even still, a crisp and cool fall evening produces great subjects with harvest-ready pumpkin patches and silhouettes of trees with half-fallen leaves.

Here are some tips that will make your night photography a delight:

1. Select a creative subject.

Sanjeev nanda tips and tricks

Light illuminating the structure at night

You might choose a romantic cityscape or the boardwalk at night. You may find favorable opportunities in shooting fireworks or other light shows. Don’t forget about bridges and other structures that may be lit at nightfall.

2. Begin with the night mode setting

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Night Mode Shot - Using a tripod is a good idea

Until you are comfortable with your camera and its settings, practice photographing nighttime scenes and subjects with your camera’s presets.

3. Elongate the exposure time

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Playing with exposure time can surprise you

A longer shutter exposure will help you to capture sharper nighttime images.

4. Don’t erase imperfection!

Blurry and out of focus images make for a unique, artistic touch. Remember, you can always delete images later, but you can’t recreate the opportunity very easily.

5. Allow a tripod to do the dirty work

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Tripod not only enhances stability but also gives you patience to click those stunning images

Affix your digital camera to a tripod for ultimate stability and elimination of camera shake. It is vital to keep the camera steady if you want to capture the best shots.

6. Consider shooting without a flash

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Low light photograph without flash

Switch between a flash and settings based on your proximity to the subject. Close subjects may benefit from flash whereas distant subjects will not. Where you have natural light, such as a full moon, overhead streetlights or bright city lights, consider shooting without a flash. You can also take photos during or just after sunset for a beautiful glowing hue.

7. Be camera-happy

Take as many photos as you like, and then take some more. If you shoot a large number of photos, you are sure to have more “keepers” than if you merely shoot a handful of each subject.

8. For situations with limited light, adjust your ISO to a higher setting

This enhances your digital camera’s sensitivity and thereby reduces blur.

9. Gradually increase your settings for best results

This is known as “bracketing,” a technique photographers use to adjust and modify their cameras’ settings without making any drastic changes. After you take a number of photos with each different setting, you’ll be able to examine the images on the computer and determine the best programming.

10. Shoot at different angles.

In addition to standard horizontal and vertical angles, get a little bit creative. Shoot wide shots for landscape and city line images and vertical shots for tall subjects. Experiment with aerial shots from atop bridges, buildings and other structures. If it is a warm evening and you are in a safe, clean location, lay on the ground and take a shot upward. Modify your angles until you find the ones that best suit your shooting style.

Many people consider nighttime photography to be a tough facet of digital photography to master. Low lighting calls for modified settings on the camera, and multiple shots to achieve the best possible image. Take your time, practice and you’ll soon discover your own talents in nighttime photography.

Sanjeev Nanda tips on How to Save Tax

25 Jun
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Save Tax

It seems that everyone reads about the latest tax-saving tips just prior to filing their returns. At this point, it’s often too late to do much about your pending tax bill. You can, however, start saving on your personal income tax bite during the year and make additional strategic moves as the year-end approaches. Here are some basic tips for saving on your taxes.

1. Keep all business-related receipts:

Keep track of what the receipts are for, and save them in a safe place.

2. Claim deductions:

Many people neglect to carefully look for, and claim, all the deductions to which they’re entitled. By simply taking the standard deduction, you may miss out on other available deductions.

3. Take all applicable tax credits :

Tax credits may be granted for various types of taxes (income tax, property tax, VAT, etc.) in recognition of taxes already paid, as a subsidy, or to encourage investment or other behaviors.

4. Take a loss:

If you’ve done well with your investments and are looking at significant capital gains, prior to year-end is the time to offset some of those gains by selling a losing venture.

5. Consider tax-free investments:

Returns are not very high, but if you’re looking for a safe, tax-friendly investment, consider tax-free government or municipal bonds, among other such investments. This type of investment is particularly good for a high-income individual.

6. Remember charitable donations:

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Donations not only save your tax but helps the needy

While donations should not be made simply for tax purposes but for philanthropic reasons, you can always make a couple more at the end of the year to lower your tax bite. Remember to get receipts.

7. Gift if you can:

This is typically for retirees with significant assets who want to gift money now rather than leave it for estate taxes later.

8. Max out your retirement plan contributions:

Of course, by doing so you’re assuming that your personal income will be lower when you withdraw the money. While that may or may not be the case, it’s safe to say that if there are a number of years until you start taking distributions, the tax laws will likely change many times over between now and then, hopefully in your favor.

9. Put your (mature age varies from country to country) children on the payroll:

By having them do some work for you, you’ll be able to shift some of your income that would be taxed at a higher rate to their lower tax bracket without being hit with kiddie taxes. Be careful, however, because college financial aid could be affected by their income.

10. Double-check your work:

Errors in tax preparation and on tax returns account for millions of dollars that taxpayers could saved every year. Remember to double-check everything.

Sanjeev Nanda On How To Find A Job

16 Jun

Finding a job in today’s economy can be tough, yet there are opportunities if you know where to look. Your best bet for finding these opportunities is not through online job boards, the classifieds, or employment agencies—it’s by talking to the people around you. Your network of friends, family members, colleagues, and acquaintances is the most valuable job search resource you have.

Sanjeev Nanda how to find a job

Networking is easy

The vast majority of job openings are never advertised; they’re filled by word of mouth. That’s why networking is the best way to find a job. Unfortunately, many job seekers are hesitant to take advantage of networking because they’re afraid of being seen as pushy, annoying, or self-serving. But networking isn’t about using other people or aggressively promoting yourself—it’s about building relationships.

Networking is the best way to find a job because:

  • People do business primarily with people they know and like. Resumes and cover letters alone are often too impersonal to convince employers to hire you.
  • Job listings tend to draw piles of applicants, which puts you in intense competition with many others. Networking makes you a recommended member of a much smaller pool.
  • The job you want may not be advertised at all. Networking leads to information and job leads, often before a formal job description is created or a job announced.

Tip 1: You know more people than you think

You may think that you don’t know anyone who can help you with your job search. But you know more people than you think, and there’s a very good chance that at least a few of these people know someone who can give you career advice or point you to a job opening. You’ll never know if you don’t ask!

Yes, you do have a job network, and it’s more powerful than you think:

  • You already belong to many networks (family, friends, colleagues, fellow civic club members, etc.) and your job search network can be natural outgrowth of these primary contacts.
  • Each network connects you to another network (e.g., your child’s teacher can connect you with other parents, schools of education, and school suppliers).
  • Each member of a network may know of an available job or a connection to someone who will know of one.
Sanjeev Nanda on how to find a job

You know More people than you think

If you’re nervous about making contact—either because you’re uncomfortable asking for favors or you’re embarrassed about your employment situation—try to keep the following things in mind:

  • It feels good to help others. Most people will gladly assist you if they can.
  • People like to give advice and be recognized for their expertise.
  • Almost everyone knows what it’s like to be out of work or looking for a job. They’ll sympathize with your situation.
  • Unemployment can be isolating and stressful. By connecting with others, you’re sure to get some much needed encouragement, fellowship, and moral support.
  • Reconnecting with the people in your network should be fun—even if you have an agenda. The more this feels like a chore the more tedious and anxiety-ridden the process will be.

Tip 2: Reach out to your network

All the connections in the world won’t help you find a job if no one knows about your situation. Once you’ve drawn up your list, start making contact with the people in your network. Let them know that you’re looking for a job. Be specific about what kind of work you’re looking for and ask them if they have any information or know anyone in a relevant field. Don’t assume that certain people won’t be able to help. You may be surprised by who they know.

Sanjeev Nanda on how to find a job

Reach Out To Your Network

Start with your references

When you are looking for a job, start with your references. Your best references—the people who like you and can endorse your abilities, track record, and character—are major networking hubs.

Sanjeev Nanda on how to find a job

Figure out what you want before you start networking

  • Contact each one of your references to network about your possibilities and affirm their agreement to be your reference.
  • Describe your goals and seek their assistance.
  • Keep them informed on your job search progress.
  • Prepare them for any calls from potential employers.
  • Let them know what happened and thank them for their help regardless of the outcome.

Tip 3: Focus on building relationships

Networking is a give-and-take process that involves making connections, sharing information, and asking questions. It’s a way of relating to others, not a technique for getting a job or a favor. You don’t have to hand out your business cards on street corners, cold call everyone on your contact list, or work a room of strangers. All you have to do is reach out.

  • Be authentic. In any job search or networking situation, being you—the real you—should be your goal. Hiding who you are or suppressing your true interests and goals will only hurt you in the long run. Pursuing what you want and not what you think others will like, will always be more fulfilling and ultimately more successful.
  • Be considerate. If you’re reconnecting with an old friend or colleague, take the time to get through the catching-up phase before you blurt out your need. On the other hand, if this person is a busy professional you don’t know well, be respectful of his or her time and come straight out with your request.
  • Ask for advice, not a job. Don’t ask for a job, a request comes with a lot of pressure. You want your contacts to become allies in your job search, not make them feel ambushed, so ask for information or insight instead. If they’re able to hire you or refer you to someone who can, they will. If not, you haven’t put them in the uncomfortable position of turning you down or telling you they can’t help.
  • Be specific in your request. Before you go off and reconnect with everyone you’ve ever known, get your act together and do a little homework. Be prepared to articulate what you’re looking for. Is it a reference? An insider’s take on the industry? A referral? An introduction to someone in the field? Also make sure to provide an update on your qualifications and recent professional experience.

Don’t be a hit-and-run networker

Don’t be a hit-and-run networker: connecting, getting what you want, and then disappearing, never to be heard from until the next time you need something. Invest in your network by following up and providing feedback to those who were kind of enough to offer their help. Thank them for their referral and assistance. Let them know whether you got the interview or the job. Or use the opportunity to report on the lack of success or the need for additional help.

Tip 4: Evaluate the quality of your network

If your networking efforts don’t seem to be going anywhere, you may need to evaluate the quality of your network. Take some time to think about your network’s strengths, weaknesses, and opportunities. Without such an evaluation, there is little chance your network will adapt to your needs and your future goals. You may not notice how bound you are to history, or how certain connections are holding you back. And you may miss opportunities to branch out and forge new ties that will help you move forward.

Taking inventory of your network and where it is lacking is time well spent. If you feel your network is out of date, then its time to upgrade! Your mere awareness of your needs will help you connect you with new and more relevant contacts and networks.

Tip 5: Take advantage of both “strong” and “weak” ties

Everyone has both “strong” and “weak” ties. Strong ties occupy that inner circle and weak ties are less established. Adding people to networks is time consuming, especially strong ties. It requires an investment of time and energy to have multiple “best friends.” Trying to stay in touch with new acquaintances is just as challenging.

But adding new “weak tie” members gives your network vitality and even more cognitive flexibility—the ability to consider new ideas and options. New relationships invigorate the network by providing a connection to new networks, viewpoints, and opportunities.

Tips for strengthening your job network

  • Tap into your strong ties. Your strong ties will logically and trustingly lead to new weak ties that build a stronger network. Use your existing network to add members and reconnect with people. Start by engaging the people in your trusted inner circle to help you fill in the gaps in your network.
  • Think about where you want to go. Your network should reflect where you’re going, not just where you’ve been. Adding people to your network who reflect issues, jobs, industries, and areas of interest is essential. If you are a new graduate or a career changer, join the professional associations that represent your desired career path. Attending conferences, reading journals, and keeping up with the lingo of your desired field can prepare you for where you want to go.
  • Make the process of connecting a priority. Make connecting a habit—part of your lifestyle. Connecting is just as important as your exercise routine. It breathes life into you and gives you confidence. Find out how your network is doing in this environment, what steps are they taking, and how you can you help. As you connect, the world will feel smaller and a small world is much easier to manage.

Tip 6: Take the time to maintain your network

Maintaining your job network is just as important as building it. Accumulating new contacts can be beneficial, but only if you have the time to nurture the relationships. Avoid the irrational impulse to meet as many new people as possible. The key is quality, rather than quantity. Focus on cultivating and maintaining your existing network. You’re sure to discover an incredible array of information, knowledge, expertise, and opportunities.

Sanjeev Nanda on how to find a job

Maintain Your Network

Schedule time with your key contacts

List the people that are crucial to your network without regard to your current relations with them—people you know who can and have been very important to you. Invariably, there will be some you have lost touch with. Reconnect and then schedule a regular meeting or phone call. You don’t need a reason to get in touch: you connect because you need to and want to. It will always make you feel good and provide you with an insight or two.

Prioritize the rest of your contacts

Keep a running list of people you need to reconnect with both old and new. People whose view of the world you value. People you’d like to get to know better or whose company you enjoy. Prioritize these contacts and then schedule time into your regular routine so you can make your way down the list.

Take notes on the people in your network

Take notes on the people in your networkCollecting cards and filing them is a start. But maintaining your contacts, new and old, requires updates. Add notes about their families, their jobs, their interests, and their needs. Unless you have a photographic memory, you won’t remember all of this information unless you write it down. Put these updates and notes on the back of their business cards or input them into your contact database.

Find ways to reciprocate

Always remember that successful networking is a two-way street. Your ultimate goal is to cultivate mutually beneficial relationships. That means giving as well as receiving. Send a thank-you note, ask them about their family, email an article you think they might be interested in, and check in periodically to see how they’re doing. By nurturing the relationship through your job search and beyond, you’ll establish a strong network of people you can count on for ideas, advice, feedback, and support.

Sanjeev Nanda tips on How to Start a Company

8 Jun

Filled with the spirit of entrepreneurship, you want to take charge and launch your own business idea. However, before you start your company, you can benefit from lining up several important elements. Be armed with an excellent product idea that will weather the competition and appeal to a majority of customers. Have funding to sustain your operations long enough until your sales become self-sufficient. Finally, acquire the regulatory and government rights to operate a business.


Sanjeev Nanda Money

Money is the backbone of any business

A frequent joke mentioned when people talk about starting their company is that money takes the first 10 slots of the top 12 things required for a successful business. This resonates true as the launch of a product idea consumes more resources than expected. You will need enough funds to cover your salary, compensations for teammates that are essential to the success of the product, prototype development, regulatory testing, and the overhead expenses of the business. Funding takes several months to gather and comes from gifts and loans from friends, or grants, or banks and venture investors. Banks and venture firms will expect the investment to be repaid with interest whereas grants extend the funds with no returns required.

Legal Setting

Each state carries its own requirements of business incorporation and legal compliance with the regulatory requirements of the industry around the product. Typically, the economic development department sponsored by each state can guide an entrepreneur with setting the business within the state’s guidelines.

Product Idea

The product being launched needs to stand above what the market can offer. The competitive advantage ought to be significant enough that customers will abandon any current competitor or practice to adopt this new solution.

Sanjeev Nanda Idea

One Great Idea is all you need

Hence, a product idea should not fuel an entrepreneurship adventure without having been vetted through interviews with future customers to understand the reasons that would convince them to buy your product. Then, with this insight into the customers’ preference, you can run a market analysis to establish how many customers will most probably buy the product.


Running a company requires expertise in development, marketing and sales know-how, and legal and business development wisdom. Even though you may think that you can wear all these hats, you will benefit most from surrounding yourself with experts who have taken the road of launching a company before. By leveraging the wisdom they have acquired in the past, you will save time and increase your chances of succeeding. In your financial budget, do include funds to hire experts to complement your expertise.

Business Plan

A Business Plan represents the strategy that you will deploy to take the company to success. A business plan becomes necessary for soliciting funding or attracting experts. It fosters a platform from which to organize your thoughts in a strategic manner. Finally it projects what you should expect financially from launching your product idea and highlights gaps that need to be filled before starting the company.

Board of Directors

If you incorporate your company, you will be asked by the state to create a Board of Directors who hold legal and fiduciary responsibilities for the company. If you plan on being the Chief Executive Officer of the company you will most probably report to the Board of Directors and therefore need to think about who you would like to see in this overseeing function.

Sanjeev Nanda on developing Self-Confidence

7 Jun

Developing self confidence is a learning process. Constant studying, improving your skills, building your knowledge and accepting yourself and others are the main characteristics of developing self confidence.

Self confidence is having faith in yourself and your ability to handle whatever situations are presented to you. You are blessed with freedom from doubt in yourself. When you need to perform a task or complete a project, you have no question in your mind that you will succeed. You are not afraid to look people in the eye or to express your thoughts.

Self confidence is a feeling which is based on your faith and your experience. Even successful people can feel insecurity inside. But what separates them from many people is their approach toward their experiences, their mental attitude what knows exactly what to do and they see their “problems” as a new, wonderful gift which is begging for the solution.

In the following you will find some tips and techniques to boost your confidence. Use the exercises you like or you feel comfortable with.

Sanjeev Nanda on developing self-confidence

Encourage Yourself | Boost your morale


By whatever means necessary, you need to develop the habit of self-encouragement. As Henry Ford said, “Whether you think you can or think you can’t, you are right.”


Lift up your chin, pull back your shoulder, stomach in, chest out and tell me that you are ready to climb the Mount Everest.


It has probably the strongest effect on people. When you take a walk or go for a meeting start with smiling at the first seconds. Just look at their face, their reaction to your warm, friendly smile. They will most likely respond back to you on the same way, with a big smile in return your friendliness.

Smile Like a baby - innocent and cute


Keep track of what you are doing, why you are doing it and what the results are. All self-improvement starts with self-awareness. Keeping a daily journal allows you to look back a day later or a week later with a certain degree of impartiality and evaluate what really happened, what could have been done differently. Over a period of time, you will clearly be able to see your own progress.


Always, always focus on what you are good at and try to be the best at it.


You have to take charge of your own mind. You have to develop a winner mentality, and to do this you have to root out the negativity that is holding you back and replace it with a positive influence. This is where positive thinking comes in. Think about what you’ve done right and what you like about yourself. Think about the goals that you are in the process of accomplishing.

Sanjeev Nanda on developing self-confidence

Never feel inferior


Nothing builds self confidence like extending a hand to someone in need. By thinking of the needs of others, you will stop dwelling on your flaws.

The amount of success you achieve in life has a lot to do with how much self confidence you have. Making the decision to work at improving your self confidence could be the most important decision you ever make.

Sanjeev Nanda tips on How to Buy Stocks

3 Jun

Buying stock in a company is relatively easy once you’ve researched the stocks you’re interested in and have a broker or brokerage account to handle your purchase. Choose your stocks with care and research before you buy anything, but keep in mind that the stock market could crash at any time for numerous reasons.

Step 1 :

Educate yourself fully about stocks before purchasing them. You can find information about stocks and brokers on the Internet.

Sanjeev Nanda on how to buy stocks

Stock Exchange

Step 2 :

Determine what you want in a broker or brokerage account. Do you want to meet with someone face-to-face? Will you want to be able to reach someone by phone? Do you require Internet access? Is price your only consideration? Do you want to buy and sell only stocks, or would you also like to buy and sell mutual funds, bonds or foreign stocks?

Step 3 :

Choose a broker or brokerage firm to purchase the stocks on your behalf based on your needs. Need a lot of advice? Start with a full-service brokerage. The least expensive brokers may not offer advice. Fairly confident and want low prices? Try an online brokerage.

Sanjeev Nanda - Brokerage Firm

Brokerage Firm

Step 4 :

Contact a broker or firm and request an application. Many firms offer online applications, although most require that you send a check or wire money to actually open the account.

Step 5 :

Deliver a check in person if possible to speed up the process.

Step 6 :

Begin buying and selling stocks once your account is open.

Sanjeev Nanda on how to buy stocks

Buy & Sell stocks

Step 7 :

Review statements you receive and reevaluate your portfolio’s performance. Are you moving toward your investment goals?

Sanjeev Nanda Tip : It pays to be an investor more than a trader.

Sanjeev Nanda tips on How to Lose Face Fat

2 Jun

The face is very important and that is also why so many people are looking for ways to lose face fat. Any weight loss will show on the face first and when people look at your face, they will straight away notice changes. Plus, influences from the media and the entertaining world also create an impact on how a pretty or sexy face should look like. If you just would flip through the magazines, the faces of the models are all very slim and well defined with high cheekbones, sharp nose and a lean face.

Curves of a model face

Model Face

Well, since so many people are looking for an answer to lose facial fat, here are a couple of tips on how to lose face fat. Before we move on to that, lets understand that there is no such thing as spot reduction. This means that if you are looking at a miracle pill or gadget that can get your cheeks down, you will be disappointed.

If you want to lose face fat, you have to begin with losing weight. This means losing excess water retention and also losing body fat. Usually, when a person loses weight, it is very noticeable that his face also gets sharper and leaner. Usually the face will slim down first because excess water is gone. Follow these simple steps to lose weight and you will get a lean, healthy and toned face.

Lose Face Fat Step 1: Drink lots of water.

You have to drink lots of water to stay hydrated. Drink at least 8 glasses of water a day. Drink more than that if you are an active person and always exposed to the sun. The thing is our body has a natural protective system. When you do not drink enough water, the body will naturally think that you are stranded in a dessert and don’t have enough water. As a result, it will store as much water as it can to keep you living and that is when you will get bloated. Vice versa, if you drink enough water, the body will flush out all the unnecessary water because it knows that the system has enough water. Stick to plain water. Sodas and sugared drink would not help because they contain sugar and will lead to bloating too.

Lose Face Fat Step 2: Do not forget your fruits and vegetables!

Stay natural and eat at least three servings of fruits and three servings of vegetables every day. This will not only fill you up with less calories and help you stay way from junk food, fruits and vegetables also contains water that can help you stay hydrated. Plus, they are filled with fiber that gives many health benefits. Make your self a healthy fruit salad for snack instead of a chocolate bar. Choose your fruits carefully though; control the amount of bananas, grapes and pineapples because they are high in fructose. Go for apples, oranges, all sorts of berries and grapefruit because they are low GI carbs and they packed full with anti oxidants.

Lose Face Fat Step 3: Reduce the alcohol

It does not matter what alcohol you drink. Wine, brandy or beer, alcohol is still alcohol. Alcohol can cause a good amount of bloating in the body because it really dehydrates the body. It can also add inches in you belly and under your chin because one gram of alcohol contains seven calories! That is almost like drinking fat!

Lose Face Fat Step 4: Bump up the calcium

A lot of studies have proven that taking at least 1200 milligrams of calcium from dairy if possible daily can help in fat loss. There is also a study that showed that half of the females in that study experienced reduced symptoms of PMS including water retention after consuming 1200 milligrams of calcium. So, do not eliminate dairy in your diet, have some in moderation.

Sources of Calcium

Sources of Calcium

Lose Face Fat Step 5: Calories out more than calories in.

This is the golden rule of fat loss. In order to lose weight, you have burn more calories than you consume. So, the easy and healthy way to do this is to burn 250 calories and reduce 250 calories from your food intake. The reason to reduce 500 calories a day is because we need to hit a reduction of 3500 calories a week and that will result to healthy recommended weight loss of one pound of body fat per week.
To burn 250 calories, just go for a simple walk or jog for 30 to 40 minutes. To reduce 250 calories, just eliminate all the junk food and excess fatty foods from your diet right now and I am sure you can reduce 250 calories. Eat healthy and eat with a mind to feed your muscles and body with good fuel!

Lose Face Fat Step 6: Control Your Salt Intake

Salt is another culprit of water retention. That is why when you snack with junk food that is high in sodium, you will feel every thirsty and your face will bloat up the next day. Avoid foods like pizza, burgers, junk food, chips and other similar foods because they are loaded with salt! When eating out, be careful of the gravy, some gravy use a lot of salt. Eat home and prepare your own food when ever possible! Sprinkle your salt, do not use your spoon, that way you can really control the amount of salt that goes into your food!

Lose Face Fat Step 7: Go For Weight Training

You have to weight train to maintain and increase lean muscle tissue. With more muscles packed in your body, your metabolism will increase and you can burn more calories and fat! Plus, with more muscles in your body, you can burn more calories while you do your cardio and even while rest because muscles are living tissues and require calories to function and survive! For optimum fat loss results and to lose fat on your face, you have to diet, do your cardio and also weight train.

Free Weight training

So, if you want to lose fat on your face, the main objective is to lose weight. By losing body fat, you will look much leaner and have a much more cut features because fat and water under the skin is reduced.